History of the Manifesto

Manifesto photo with John Longnew1

Welcome to the Bristol Manifesto for Race Equality. Since June 2017 we have established an Interim Commission for Race Equality, with endorsement from the Bristol Mayor and the City Office. A full Commission will come into effect early 2018. Further information to follow in September 2017 on how to apply to become a Commissioner. 

The idea of the Manifesto is to make a clear declaration of our values, vision and intentions for our communities, with a call for action and a timeline to see change become reality. Work on the Bristol Manifesto for Race Equality has resulted in a set of core principles and expectations along with key priority issues.

Please see below the Bristol Manifesto for Race Equality document

Commissioner applications for the Commission for Race Equality

So that we can ensure this opportunity reaches the widest audience the deadline for Commissioner applications for the Commission for Race Equality is extended to Monday 6th November, 1pm

 manifesto document

How did the Manifesto come into being?

The idea of a Manifesto for Race Equality in Bristol was reborn in the aftermath of the city’s 2013 Stephen Lawrence Lecture.

At the end of a powerful series of presentations, a member of the audience asked how far we (our BME communities) had actually come in the 20 years since the murder? In a time of sober reflection on levels of employment, mental health, educational attainment, poverty and political representation, the audience confronted the fact that we had not come as far as we would have liked in race equality terms, and in some areas had actually gone backwards.

A few of us began meeting with people from our diverse Black & Minority Ethnic communities. We began asking what we need to do to ensure we will not be asking the same questions in 20 years? We asked how we could ensure our communities could begin to take control of their futures?

The idea of the Manifesto came from these discussions: a clear declaration of our values, vision and intentions for our communities, with a call for action and a timeline to see change become reality.

The Manifesto will be a live document which will prioritise new issues as changes and actions are achieved.

Thank you in advance for contributing to our future.

Please remember: “The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now!”

Why is BME Voice important for Bristol’s communities?  

Demographics in the city has changed. In 2001 Bristol’s BME population (including non British white) was 16%. At the last census count in 2011, this figure was 22%, and is increasing. The percentage of the BME population in Bristol’s schools is 33% BME. Bristol has one of the most diverse numbers of BME communities in the UK. See this Bristol population data: http://bristolresearchnetwork.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/the-population-of-bristol-september-2014/

The need for a Bristol Manifesto for Race is even more urgent as we work with communities, the VCS and key public sector agencies to ensure that achieving Race Equality enables Bristol to become a city that is fair and equal for all; where all people, regardless of ethnic background, are motivated and inspired to succeed and where these successes bring about real benefits to all in our city.

Agencies and Individuals represented on the group drafting the Manifesto include:

  • Voscur/Bristol BME Voice
  • SARI (Stand against Racism & Inequality)
  • Avon and Somerset Black Police Association
  • Black South West Network
  • Building the Bridge
  • Nilaari
  • Public Health Bristol
  • 2morrow 2day/Ujima Radio
  • Bristol City Council (Equalities Team)
  • Somali Media Group
  • Monira Ahmed Chowdhury
  • Amjid Ali
  • Tara Mistry

How did the Manifesto come into being?

The idea of a Manifesto for Race Equality in Bristol was reborn in the aftermath of the city’s 2013 Stephen Lawrence Lecture.

At the end of a powerful series of presentations, a member of the audience asked how far we (our BME communities) had actually come in the 20 years since the murder? In a time of sober reflection on levels of employment, mental health, educational attainment, poverty and political representation, the audience confronted the fact that we had not come as far as we would have liked in race equality terms, and in some areas had actually gone backwards.

A few of us began meeting with people from our diverse Black & Minority Ethnic communities. We began asking what we need to do to ensure we will not be asking the same questions in 20 years? We asked how we could ensure our communities could begin to take control of their futures?

The idea of the Manifesto came from these discussions: a clear declaration of our values, vision and intentions for our communities, with a call for action and a timeline to see change become reality.

The Manifesto will be a live document which will prioritise new issues as changes and actions are achieved.

Thank you in advance for contributing to our future.

Please remember: “The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now!”

Agencies represented on the group drafting the Manifesto include:

  • Voscur/Bristol BME Voice
  • SARI (Stand against Racism & Inequality)
  • Avon and Somerset Black Police Association
  • Black South West Network
  • Building the Bridge
  • Nilaari
  • Public Health Bristol
  • 2morrow 2day/Ujima Radio
  • Bristol City Council (Equalities Team)
  • Somali Media Group
  • Monira Ahmed Chowdhury
  • Amjid Ali
  • Tara Mistry